Saturday, April 20, 2024

The Ministry of Education in Kenya called to have a national conference on UNESCO Framework AI Guidance for Schools

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According to UNESCO, while 50% of students have used a generative AI tool (CDT), less than 7% of schools have clear guidance on the safe, effective, and responsible use of AI.

The UNESCO Guidance then sets out seven key steps for governments should take to regulate Generative AI and establish policy frameworks for its ethical use in education and research, including through the adoption of global, regional or national data protection and privacy standards. It also sets an age limit of 13 for the use of AI tools in the classroom and calls for teacher training on this subject.

Several months ago, Microsoft released its work trend index, which surveyed 31,000 people in 31 countries. Nearly three-quarters (70%) of respondents said they would like to delegate as much work as possible to AI to lessen their current workload.For its part, Microsoft said: “AI is poised to create a whole new way of working.”

Predictions suggest that by the time current kindergartners graduate from high school, AI will be a billion times smarter than humans. This underscores the importance of integrating AI into education from an early age, to prepare students for a future where AI will play a significant role in all aspects of society. Robotics and artificial intelligence (AI) are rapidly changing the world, and it is essential that our students are prepared for these changes. The sector perhaps most at risk of disruption is education. Unlike other technological game changers, which have accompanied human cognition over time — the telegraph, the telephone, and basic computing power — AI does not just accompany us; it could modify present and future generations’ cognition. This is because human socialization and organic, human pedagogies are being replaced with artificial tutors and automated feedback loops that could change the development of our neurocircuitry.

According to TED AI, artificial intelligence (AI) can superpower teaching: At Khan Academy, AI is being used to provide clear, actionable answers to students and improve their writing skills through collaborative exercises, among other new features.

Teacher support: This technology could serve as a comprehensive teaching assistant, equipping teachers with comprehensive resources, lessons plans and progress reports.

Solve the scale problem: AI can provide one-to-one tutoring to anyone who wants it – a once -impossible dream – and potentially achieve the significant improvements  that can be gained with personalized instruction.

The Ministry of Education Kenya is called upon to have a national conference on UNESCO Framework AI Guidance for Schools Toolkit_Teach AI  Policy in Kenya Education System.

Artificial intelligence (AI) is rapidly transforming all aspects of our lives, and education is no exception. AI has the potential to revolutionize the way we teach and learn, but it is important to ensure that AI is used in a responsible and ethical way in schools.

The UNESCO Framework for AI Guidance for Schools Toolkit, developed by the Teach AI initiative, provides schools with the resources and guidance they need to implement AI responsibly and ethically. The toolkit covers a wide range of topics, including:

  • What is AI and how does it work?
  • The potential benefits and risks of AI in schools
  • How to choose and implement AI tools in schools
  • How to teach students about AI
  • How to ensure that AI is used in a fair and equitable way

A national conference on UNESCO Framework AI Guidance for Schools Toolkit_Teach AI  Policy in Kenya Education System would provide an opportunity for Kenyan schools to learn about the toolkit and how to use it to implement AI responsibly and ethically. The conference would also be an opportunity for the Ministry of Education to develop a national policy on the use of AI in schools.

The conference could be attended by a variety of stakeholders, including:

  • School leaders
  • Teachers
  • Parents
  • Students
  • Policymakers
  • Researchers
  • Technology companies

The conference could include a variety of activities, such as:

  • Keynote presentations by experts on AI in education
  • Panel discussions on the benefits and risks of AI in schools
  • Workshops on how to use the UNESCO Framework for AI Guidance for Schools Toolkit
  • Case studies from schools that have successfully implemented AI

The conference could also be used to launch a national policy on the use of AI in schools. The policy could be developed by a working group of stakeholders, including representatives from the Ministry of Education, schools, teachers, parents, students, and the technology industry.

A national conference on UNESCO Framework AI Guidance for Schools Toolkit_Teach AI  Policy in Kenya Education System would be a valuable opportunity for Kenya to become a leader in the responsible and ethical use of AI in education.

Robotics Society of Kenya (RSK)

The Robotics Society of Kenya (RSK) is a registered non-profit organization (R.54783) based  in Kenya. With a mission to promote computing in institutions and communities through robotics, artificial intelligence (AI), physical computing, makerspace, Internet of Things (IoT), STEAM, chess education, and research. We aim to engage with a community of passionate educators, volunteers, partners, and sponsors who bring the benefits of technology to schools, classrooms, and communities in Kenya and beyond.

  • In an interview with the Daily Nation, a leading Kenyan newspaper, on “How Africa is getting ready for the impending age of robotics,” the Robotics Society of Kenya (RSK) reaffirmed the importance of introducing AI and robotics learning to school-going children early in their learning life. Policy makers have recognised that it’s important to introduce STEM and coding concepts in early childhood, because research proves that starting children young with STEM has the greatest impact on their success in STEM education and their interest in STEM careers.
  • A 2020 study by the University of California, Berkeley found that children who are exposed to coding in early childhood are better at problem-solving and logical thinking than children who are not exposed to coding.
  • The Robotics Society of Kenya (RSK) called on the Ministry of Education in Kenya to establish robotics clubs in schools and institutions, arguing that robotics can provide students with the opportunity to learn about these technologies in a fun and engaging way.
  • The Kenya Robotics and Artificial Intelligence Society (KRAIS) will play a vital role in ensuring that robotics and AI are developed and used responsibly in Kenya. The society will provide a forum for stakeholders from across the country to come together, share ideas, and collaborate on projects. KRAIS will also work to educate the public about robotics and AI and to promote the responsible use of these technologies.
  • During the presentation of the Proposed Kenya Robotics and Artificial Intelligence Bill, 2023, to the Kenya Senate Standing Committee on ICT, the Robotics Society of Kenya recommended that Microsoft Kenya help to develop and implement the national conference on UNESCO Framework AI Guidance for Schools Toolkit_Teach AI Policy in Kenya Education System.
  • The Robotics Society of Kenya (RSK) is organizing a national  educator  event on December 1, 2023, in Nairobi . It is a one-day event for students, teachers, and enthusiasts of robotics and AI. It will feature workshops, demonstrations, and hands-on activities.

  • The Robotics Society of Kenya (RSK) is organizing Raspberry Pi Jam Mombasa  a community event on December 8, 2023, called Experience #raspberrypi5 Jam Mombasa. It is a one-day event for students, teachers, and enthusiasts of robotics and AI. It will feature workshops, demonstrations, and hands-on activities.

Conclusion

This statistic highlights the need for schools to develop and implement clear policies and procedures on the use of AI in education. Generative AI tools can be used for a variety of educational purposes, such as generating creative content, translating languages, and writing different kinds of creative content. However, it is important to ensure that these tools are used in a way that is safe, effective, and responsible.

Schools should also develop policies and procedures for addressing plagiarism and other forms of academic misconduct that may be associated with the use of generative AI tools.

By developing clear guidance on the use of AI in education, schools can help to ensure that students are able to use these tools safely and effectively to enhance their learning.

Samuel Musila
Samuel Musilahttps://techknow.africa
Passionate Software Developer and Tech content creator From Nairobi, Kenya

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